Should I Slash Or Mulch?

Should I Slash Or Mulch? Gardening Tips To Be Garden-Savvy

Fields of grass and crops can grow up to lengths above the average person’s height, or somewhere below the waist, or even knees. In other words, depending on the type of plant you’re growing, the possibilities are endless.

With such a challenging level of upkeep, one must rely on machinery to assist with “cleaning up” the lot. Crop and grass-cutting, especially over large fields can be done with equipment that’s manufactured distinctly for this purpose.

Now, the question remains: “Should I slash or mulch?” Or are they basically the same process without much difference, one from the other? Let’s start with a basic definition of terms

Slashing

Recognized as being an older method than mulching, slashing utilizes a technology wherein it cuts grass up to a certain extent. And it does the job even if it’s considered old-school. This being said, it doesn’t cut undergrowth. In other words, it trims up to a certain height, and not very close to the actual soil level.

Due to this, many believe that this may impede the quality of premium greens because it doesn’t do much to organic material right atop the soil. Instead of a tidy and short “slash”, it leaves long strands of grass here and there. Thus, farmers tend to wield another cutting equipment over the same parts to eliminate stand tall strands that are sticking out.

Still, if price is what you’re after, machinery price, that is, then this is something you can attempt to test.

Mulching

If slashing is old-school, then mulching is its modern alternative. But aside from mulching devices being more advanced in technology, it also does away with the problems of slashing— mainly, cutting straight through without leaving strands behind.

There are 2 main categories when it comes to mulching— high and low-body. For the first, the high-body is routinely exercised for grazing. It’s able to trim so that the results will be finely cut, short blades of grass that are very close to the ground.

What’s more, the cut pieces of grass become mulch, which is ideal for spreading it across the pasture evenly. You should also take note that mulchers are easier to maneuver in the sense that you won’t have to always look behind you to ensure that you didn’t miss out of certain areas along the path.

The shredding bar is what’s responsible for reducing the height of the grass. Also, it’s what breaks down the rest into mulch.

Addedly, the high-body kind which is paired with a Y flail is excellent for prunings.

As for the low-body, it operates with a hammer flair so the results are a much flatter appearance compared to the first. Parks and orchards tend to prefer this than the high-body type precisely because of this factor.

Slash Or Mulch? Which Should You Choose?

At the end of the day, it’ll be up to you and your farming needs. For pastures that should have organic material because they’re for grazing, then mulching is your go-to. Anticipate that mulching equipment is pricier than their slashing alternative. Still, precision is what you’re after so that shouldn’t be surprising.

In contrast, if it’s not necessary for your lands’ grass to be turned into good mulch and you simply want to trim them without being too keen on their height, you can go for slashers.

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